Call your mom & Say You’re Sorry

When you move, I move! 2020 BRUNAKRA continues to invite physical theatre and dance groups into our residency program. We’re happy to have the dance collective Call your Mom from Baltimore USA, as residents in April. To say sorry is to move harts. Acceptance is everything, look firmly on what you have around you, and adopt, react, interact.

Say You’re Sorry is Call your Moms grandest project yet – a set of collaborative forgiveness experiments spanning four countries and eight US states. In each place we work with artists, faith groups, and social justice movements to formulate questions and solutions on making amends. What does a forgiving future look like? What redemptive tools do we have to lend to one another?

Say You’re Sorry is a multimedia exploration of forgiveness and redemption. From September 2019 through May 2020, Call Your Mom will be developing various aspects of Say You’re Sorry at residencies across the country and world.

Call your Mom: Collaboration is our holy idea.

  • When we are wholly ourselves in creation, new languages and powers are possible.
  • Collaboration requires trust and earnest engagement. 
  • As collaborators, we define the rules of ownership. Ownership is collective and each idea is built from the culture of our togetherness. 
  • Audiences are not only viewers, they are also collaborators. 
  • Collaboration is commitment to one another in resistance to a culture of transaction and individualist gains. It is the practice of learning and yearning to live non-transactionally. Prolonged collaboration means trust in the unlimited giving of each collaborator without needing to reap its benefits. 
  • Collaboration creates its own beauty.

Call Your Mom is a multimedia performance group and making family. Founded in 2014, Mia Massimino, Emma Bergman, Sophie Goldberg, and E Cadoux work in a horizontal structure to make evocative, empathetic, and multimodal art. Our works include THIS CLOSE (2016), an interactive stage show about translation and miscommunication, Household (2017), a large-scale installation about domesticity and emotional ghosts, and Too Day (2018), a fictional holiday celebrating rituals between strangers.